The third letter

Damaging

Destructive

Disruptive

Demanding

Debilitating

Disastrous

Deadly

Draining

Depressing

Demoralising

Deafening

Disruptive

Domineering

Dominating

Deceptive

Dreadful

Disorder

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Alternative therapies

I had an interesting discussion on Twitter recently with a “Cognitive hypnotherapist” who was very keen to treat people who have OCD. If they had also been a BABCP accredited Cognitive Behavioural Therapist with good experience of treating people with OCD, I would have said, “fair enough. Please work on unhindered by me”. 

But they weren’t. There wasn’t a single mention on their entire website about OCD treatment and only one mention of treating anxiety, not anxiety disorders. Mostly it was the usual hypnotherapy stuff about weightloss, stopping smoking, business success and confidence boosting. But disturbingly, there was also mention of curing the infertility caused by polycystic ovary syndrome with hypnotism and also past life regression using hypnosis. And this person wants to get into the minds of people with OCD?! She may sincerely believe that she can help, but OH-MY-GOD! There was also reference to NLP (neuro linguistic programming) and life coaching. Whenever I see the unholy trio of hypnotherapy, NLP and life coaching, it sets off the QUACK ALERT alarm bells. Every single one of these life coaching people I have met at small business networking events, I would guess 17 or 18 of them, have been lovely, earnest, keen, deeply damaged individuals who should NEVER be allowed to tinker with another person’s fragile mind. 

I was wary about letting anyone into my head, even a properly trained, accredited, experienced medical professional. It only eventually happened as a last resort, when it was a choice of either that or death by suicide. I’m glad that I chose the former, not the latter. But even then, it was difficult to trust someone else. Now imagine if I had been looking over the edge of the abyss and a friend who had lost some weight by going to a hypnotherapist had recommended them to me because they “did OCD too”. It makes me shudder in fear and disgust. That person would have “had a go” at treating somebody, using hypnosis, who needed immediate crisis care from specialist mental health professionals. 

It’s this kind of example which makes me instinctively wary of all alternative remedies and therapies. There are just so many jolly, well meaning, utter fruitcakes out there, willing to “have a go”. If the laws were less strict, would they “have a go” at being amateur dentists too?

I have seen the following “therapies” and remedies touted online as suitable for curing OCD:

  • Number therapy
  • Hypnotherapy
  • The Linden Method
  • The Lightning Process
  • NLP
  • Life coaching
  • Crystal healing
  • Herb therapy
  • Nutrition therapy
  • Vitamin therapy
  • Dietary supplement therapy
  • Vegan diet therapy
  • EFT – Emotional Freedom Technique
  • Exorcism
  • Faith healing
  • Prayer therapy 
  • Experimental electric current therapy

The U.K. National Health treatment regulator NICE (national institute for health and clinical excellence) recommends none of these for treatment of OCD. The only one to have shown evidence of even a short term benefit is hypnotherapy and there is still no objective scientific evidence of any kind of efficacy. The approved therapy is CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy), sometimes used in conjunction with medication. CBT works for many, but not universally. I’m not an unquestioning cheerleader for CBT, but it has worked and does work for me. 

I am not totally closed to the idea of using other things to help improve mental health and resilience, just very difficult to persuade. 

I reluctantly tried mindfulness. With its links to Buddhism, prayer bells and incense sticks, it seemed a bit hippy-drippy and ethereal to me. It also smacked of being the latest fashionable lifestyle fad bandwagon to jump aboard.

But a couple of trusted friends had achieved some success in using mindfulness, so I chose to give it a go. In my usual thorough way, I investigated the possible ways of trying it out. Local practitioners? Surprisingly few. And heavy on the prayer bells and zen. Online then? I looked for mindfulness apps and discovered Headspace. 

After persisting for several weeks, with my OCD conditioned mind wrestling with the completely alien concept of letting thoughts go, it started to work. I’ve found it to be a useful, real life tool and technique to use, alongside CBT techniques, to expedite my own recovery. 

So, you see, my mind isn’t closed to a broader approach to achieving recovery. I just recognise a snakeoil salesman or dangerously wellmeaning amateur when I see one. I believe there should be tighter regulation on what supposed “therapies” can be offered commercially as being effective for overcoming serious mental illness. I can’t set up a business as a mender of broken legs using a hot bread poultice, but I could set up a business tomorrow offering hot bread poultice cures for depression, #OCD, #PTSD and other anxiety disorders. This would be laughable, if it wasn’t so incredibly dangerous and happening RIGHT NOW. 

In the meantime, whenever I encounter an enthusiastic, well meaning idiot, I try to persuade them to leave treating actual mental illnesses to trained, accredited medical professionals and for them to stick to business performance coaching. And I also report the few genuinely cynical charlatons I come across, preying on vulnerable, fragile people who may be at the lowest ebb. 

If you’re going to let anyone inside your mind, it’s reasonable to be cautious, even with trained, experienced professionals. It is a great thing to be helped towards recovery, but the mind is as delicate as the human heart and more intricate than the human cardiovascular system. You wouldn’t place your heart into the hands of anyone but a highly skilled, experienced professional. Why risk the mind with anyone less capable or trustworthy?